Shawn L. Bird

Original poetry, commentary, and fiction. All copyrights reserved.

poem-#IReadCanadaDay February 19, 2020

I have been reading through your story

in short bits.  Your words hurt

my heart. It is so much work for some

people to survive from day to day. They

don’t deserve their painful realities, and my

opportunities are so apparent,

under my reading lamp.

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#firstnationsauthors #indigenousauthor

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(ignore WordPress ads)

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poem- prep July 14, 2018

Beneath a cloudless blue sky

I feel the storm coming,

black clouds gathering.

Could they reflect black shirts?

I ponder,

seriously,

if I should be building false walls

to hide those who will be escaping tyranny.

I wonder,

if I am far enough from a border to avoid

occupation.

A century ago,

they didn’t understand the signs,

but now we do.

Those who read are the first removed

when the evil rises.

Do all those kids who demanded,

“Why do we have to learn this?”

remember that their teachers said,

“So you’ll see the signs.”

“So it will never happen again.”

“Remember, they elected Hitler;

“they heiled and fell for his lies,

“because they wanted to believe their superiority,

“wanted a scapegoat for their troubles.”

There can be no excuses.

Shall I buy bricks or drywall?

Where will I construct false bottoms?

Where will we hide in the resulting rubble,

when the jack boots stomp through?

Another cristelnacht, this time in New York?

The hammock swings its consolation:

It can’t happen here.

It won’t happen here.

How many said those words a century

ago?

How many grew to knowing the meaning

of fear?

 

poem-code August 2, 2017

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 12:57 pm
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I read your words

poetic rendering

of a message you

send to the world.

I read your words

seeking for your

meaning. Seeking

without success.

I read your words

and they are only

bar bar babble.

Your words shout

they moan and cry.

I read your words

but I can’t find

your message.

I read your words,

but

I am not your

cryptographer.

 

poem-instructions January 25, 2017

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 10:41 am
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So much difficulty

is avoided

when we read the instructions.

If you don’t know what is asked

why do you try

to answer?

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I’m marking exams at the moment and astonished at how often answers in no way reflect the question asked.

 

poem-reader December 20, 2015

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 2:12 pm
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Perhaps, because I’m reading

Dust bunnies scamper across my floors

hiding beneath tables, gathering behind doors.

Perhaps, because I’m reading

Dishes stack into tall piles

and papers are exploding in spurts, beyond their files.

Perhaps, because I’m reading

I ignore the telephone,

but then, because I’m reading,

I’m content within my home.

 

poem- pages September 4, 2015

Filed under: poem — Shawn L. Bird @ 6:34 pm
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Beneath the dusty cover,

these pages are a brown tinged

crinkly time machine.

 

poem-story sorry May 31, 2015

Filed under: fun,Poetry,Reading — Shawn L. Bird @ 5:04 pm
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I’m caught in a story

I can’t come out;

I’ll say I’m sorry.

But

I must stay and read

this day away,

Not really sorry to be

in need of story

 

poem-flipped January 23, 2015

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 3:35 pm
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You need a silent rest

and I need recumbency.

I find a peaceful place,

I recline and read and write

throughout the night,

come to bed at dawn

to greet you as you rise.

But office workers

call at nine, nine thirty, ten

and so with blurry eyes I

pretend lucidity,

then fall back to sleep

until you return at two.

My head and ankle

have schedules

out of sync with offices,

though I’m in tuneful counterpoint

with you.

 

 

 

video- likes authors October 26, 2014

Here’s a Moxy Früvous performance for those spouses whose loved ones always have a nose between pages…

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reading-5 ways to help an author August 12, 2014

Filed under: Reading,Writing — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:45 am
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Most of a publishing house’s marketing budget goes to its most popular, A-list authors.  You know: the ones least in need of the promotion.  If you have found a mid-list or new author whose work you enjoy, you can become a crucial, and very appreciated, part of his/her success.  What’s more, your enthusiasm may encourage him/her to keep writing!  Here’s how.

1. Leave honestly positive reviews everywhere you can:  Goodreads, Amazon, Kobo, your library, iBooks.  Tell people what you really liked about the book’s characters, themes, setting, style, and the genre on your blog, Facebook, Twitter, and anywhere else you can think of.  Reviews are key for a new reader to take a risk on an unknown author.

2. Tell your friends!  If you have a friend who likes the genre, recommend the book.  But, do the author a favour.  If your friends read romance, don’t recommend a horror book, because it will probably lead to a one star review somewhere.  Some people shouldn’t read the book.  The more often someone sees a name, the more likely they are to eventually pick it up, so talk about the book on social media, and link to the author’s profile.

3. Submit a book acquisition request at your local library.  This can often be done on your library’s website.  When the book is in, take it out, and encourage your friends to take it out.  Personally recommend the book to strangers in the library.  If you see it hiding on the shelf, turn it facing out, or set it on a table where it will catch the eye of someone who might otherwise not notice it.

4. Offer to be part of the author’s street team or to be a beta reader for future projects.  You may get early release copy of future books in exchange for your review.  There may be other perks, like a mention in the acknowledgements of the author’s next book.  If you’re doing the 5 things on this list, the author would love to know who you are, so be sure to introduce yourself on social media.

5. Give the book as a gift!  Buy several copies of the book to share with people you think would love it like you do.  If you know the author, get the book signed for your friends or relatives.  Author signed books are cool birthday or Christmas gifts.  If you are far away, some authors (like me!) will mail you signed book plates to put into your copy or are on Authorgraph so you can download a pdf.

It’s all about sharing the book love!  

 

 
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