Shawn L. Bird

Original poetry, commentary, and fiction. All copyrights reserved.

quote-write for kids March 13, 2019

Filed under: Quotations,Writing — Shawn L. Bird @ 10:09 pm
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“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.”

~Madeleine L’Engle

How profound is this?  And what a truth!  Some of the most powerful literature is written for kids. It challenges thinking and shines a light on what the world is like, encouraging them to question the status quo and make changes to improve society.

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quote- the world is high school August 22, 2018

Filed under: Quotations — Shawn L. Bird @ 11:34 pm
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“Maybe it’s better to look stupid, but strong, than it is to look smart, but weak.  I don’t know.  I not sure that I want to believe that the world stage bears that strong a resemblance to high school.”

Jim Butcher in Turn Coat.

 

quote- home May 21, 2017

Filed under: Quotations — Shawn L. Bird @ 6:54 pm
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“Wherever you have friends, that’s your country.

Wherever you receive love, that’s your home.”

Tibetan proverb quoted by the Dalai Lama in The Book of Joy (I highly recommend this book!)

This quote brilliantly summarizes my experience of life with and as an exchange student.   Half your heart has moved to a new location.

 

Quote- Make Time October 11, 2016

Filed under: Writing — Shawn L. Bird @ 11:42 am
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Writing is done in the time we make, not the time we find.

~Amy Sue Nathan

(Writer’s Workbook, Writer’s Digest. 2016)

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I teach my students that writing isn’t about inspiration, it’s about sitting down and doing.  I often have no idea what I’m going to put on a page until I sit down with the intent to get 500 words today, or whatever.  Then I’ll hear the voice of a character, tune in, and record the conversation.   Identifying even snippets of time to focus on writing makes a difference.  Sometimes those are otherwise lost moments, that become significant because of the writing that happened in those moments.

What do you think?  Do you find time or make time for your writing?

 

poem-memorized May 20, 2016

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 11:59 am
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Mrs. Filber’s daughter memorized Poe’s The Raven and recited it for her mother’s sixth grade class. Student Wanda reflected years later, “This was my first encounter with the power of poetry…How independent Mrs. Filber’s daughter was–she could conjure up this poem at any time in the future, enjoying it again and again!” (May, W. 1991. “The Arts and Curriculum as Lingering.” p. 145).

What power in memory

to pull from air,

call upon bardic traditions,

weave words around ears.

Captivate.

Infiltrate.

Enervate

with poetry.

.

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(A little poetry inspired by my grad school reading today).

 

quote-choices April 24, 2016

Filed under: Poetry,Quotations — Shawn L. Bird @ 12:41 pm
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When a woman makes the choice to marry, to have children; in one way her life begins but in another way it stops. You build a life of details. You become a mother, a wife and you stop and stay steady so that your children can move. And when they leave they take your life of details with them. And then you’re expected move again only you don’t remember what moves you because no-one has asked in so long. Not even yourself. You never in your life think that love like this can happen to you.

~Francesca in Bridges of Madison County

by Robert James Waller.

It was hard to imagine what life would be once kids had grown and moved off to their own independent lives.  Some women have invested so much in their children that they have to dig deeply to find that they are no longer who they were before children, and it’s time to find a new identity.  It can bring depression and a sense of loss.

I confess, I was not one of those women.  For me, departure of the children was a celebration and an immediate flowering.  I started writing Grace Awakening a month after our kids moved out.  A new life began on the page and a new world enfolded before me as I began interacting with authors.  It made me thankful we’d had our kids so young. 🙂

 

quote from Jenny Hubbard January 15, 2016

Filed under: Literature,Quotations — Shawn L. Bird @ 2:50 pm
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In the book, And We Stay by Jenny Hubbard, protagonist Emily is sorting out the world by writing poetry and reading Emily Dickinson.  The book is full of poetry and is written with a very poetic tone. Here is a particularly beautiful passage:

So sew. Either way you spell it, on its own, the word looks wrong.  Emily could write a poem about it, about how sew needs a subject, an object.  About how a girl needs a duty to lock her in place. So if she sits at a desk, scrawls words on paper, are the words as lonely as she, or do they sow seeds into a soul across time, across centuries?  Was Emily Dickinson ever able to thread the words together in such a way that she was beyond the need for stitches?

 

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