Shawn L. Bird

Original poetry, commentary, and fiction. All copyrights reserved.

poem- bother August 17, 2016

Filed under: Poetry,poodles — Shawn L. Bird @ 3:08 pm
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Fabric on the ground

Measure and pin.

Ah! A helper!

Sit on the fabric

Upset the pins

Give me kisses

Crawl into my lap

Production stops.

Canine cuddles provided,

into isolation you go.

Work resumes.

 

poem-stitches August 2, 2014

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:14 pm
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Gossamer strings

weaving between

emptiness,

the lace

slides

beneath needles

as I stitch air

into beauty.

 

poem-tired August 1, 2014

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 2:38 pm
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I need new pyjamas.

The effort of hunting through stores

hurts my head.

I have fabric, thread, pattern

and machines.

It’d only take an hour to make,

But just taking

the serger out of the box

seems too great a challenge.

I think finishing my last novel

was more exhausting than

it seemed.

 

poem-stitching July 16, 2014

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 2:07 am
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So long ago

sewing tiny pearl beads

around a gauzy net

to form a bridal halo

stitching dreams together.

Drops of crimson

from pricked fingers

drip upon the silk flower crown

white for purity

red for courage

blood for

hope.

.

.

.

Anniversary approaching.  You can see the veil in question on an older post here.

 

and it was good December 10, 2011

Filed under: projects — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:54 am
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I have seen The Kilt worn.  It is good.

  • The way the pleats fit smoothly from waist to hips, accenting the slight curve.
  • The way the pleats swing with the stride.
  • The way it accents the positive.

>>sigh<<

We had to adjust the length of the sporran chain, though.  Hubby stared aghast at the initial placement and exclaimed, “No!  That’s like saying ‘X marks the spot!'”

After I stopped laughing, I moved up the chain, and then investigated proper sporran placement at X marks the Scot and the Tartan Authority.  2-3″ below the belt buckle is correct for the top of the sporran, apparently.  We’re still waiting for the arrival of the belt and buckle, but I think we’ve got it close.

Photos? you suggest.

Umm.  Well.  The Husband is a trifle shy.  He is nervous of appearing on the internet in a kilt.  I’ll work on him.  When all the accoutrements have arrived, I will take a photo.  If I have to remove his head, I will.  I keep getting requests for the final product.  Patience!  ;-P

I have seen.  It is good.

Trust me.

.

.

1. hem the approximately 8 yards of fabric

2. set the lining

3. pin the pleats according to hubby’s preference

4. press the pleats

5. manipulate the pleats from the fit at the hip to the narrower waist

6. hand stitch the 7-8 yards of hip pleats into position

7. baste pleats onto the lining

8. hand stitch the waist pleats

9. add apron fringe fabric

10. add waistband

11. pull threads to make fringe

12. add buckle closures (2)

13. figure out inner closure…

14.  add hanging loops (sporran loops- rather than hanging loops, actually)

15. sigh dramatically as spouse models completed kilt!

 

All done! December 6, 2011

Filed under: projects — Shawn L. Bird @ 11:38 pm
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Today, the straps and buckles arrived from Scotland at last, and so I was able to finish off the kilt.

I started by sewing down the waistband. You’re supposed to match the plaid across the front apron. If you look closely, you’ll see that the very centre matches, but the print on the band is smaller than the apron. This is because while it turns out the the Saskatchewan tartan is balanced left to right, it isn’t up and down (though it looks like it is!). I needed the full width (divided in half) of the fabric for my tall husband, and so I was forced to cut the waist band from the end.

I made the under closure with a strap of velcro on the apron that connect through a loop on the inside of the kilt.

The leather straps from Scotland needed stitch holes, so I used my Dremel drill to make them. The buckles are attached using fabric straps, that are matched to the plaid. The hole for the buckle prong is a half inch button hole. The fabric straps are hand stitched down, and well camouflaged.

And that’s it! My first kilt is complete! After some 30 hours of ironing and stitching by hand and machine later, the project in Saskatchewan tartan is complete. The sporran has arrived from Scotland via eBay, as has a pair of “Lovat green kilt hose.” The garters and a set of flashes are done. Now, we have to wait for my November 22nd Scotsweb order. Apparently the kilt belt is still not in, and the order won’t be shipped until Friday (December 9). A clan crest buckle, ecru hose, and a kilt pin will arrive with it.  An additional purchase was a kilt hanger.  A regular skirt hanger can’t take 3 lbs of kilt, but a kilt hanger is wider and has 4 clamps.  With luck, we should be able to completely outfit the husband of the house in his finery by Christmas. Stay tuned!

Would I do it again?

Well. Yesterday I picked up 4 metres of green and blue Alberta tartan…

.

.

1. hem the approximately 8 yards of fabric

2. set the lining

3. pin the pleats according to hubby’s preference

4. press the pleats

5. manipulate the pleats from the fit at the hip to the narrower waist

6. hand stitch the 7-8 yards of hip pleats into position

7. baste pleats onto the lining

8. hand stitch the waist pleats

9. add apron fringe fabric

10. add waistband

11. pull threads to make fringe

12. add buckle closures (2)

13. figure out inner closure…

14.  add hanging loops (sporran loops- rather than hanging loops, actually)

15. sigh dramatically as spouse models completed kilt!

Bird-13

and there we are September 2017…

 

kilting continuance November 23, 2011

Filed under: projects — Shawn L. Bird @ 6:22 pm
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The latest report on the kilt making!

1. hem the approximately 8 yards of fabric

2. set the lining

3. pin the pleats according to hubby’s preference

4. press the pleats

5. manipulate the pleats from the fit at the hip to the narrower waist

6. hand stitch the 7-8 yards of hip pleats into position

7. baste pleats onto the lining

8. hand stitch the waist pleats

9. add apron fringe fabric

10. add waistband

11. pull threads to make fringe

12. add buckle closures (2)

13. figure out inner closure…

14.  add hanging loops

15. sigh dramatically as spouse models completed kilt!

At last report, I was anticipating having to re-do the stitching.  After subsequent measuring, I decided that I was just going to leave it.  The measurements are close enough (1/2″ off).  I am not sure whether I am actually going to put in a lining, but if so, I’ll be able to tighten the top two inches of the kilt  with the one inch waistband, I think.

I would be finished, except I determined that the 3 lbs of fabric requires MUCH sturdier buckles and straps that the wimpy pair I’d picked up at the fabric store when I bought my fabric.  I have therefore ordered a sturdier set from a kiltmaker in Scotland.  I will be inserting the straps into the waist band when they arrive, so I’m at a stop.

I am also waiting for a package from http://www.scotweb.co.uk/ that includes a clan buckle, kilt belt, and kilt hose (aka socks).  I have made garters and flashes.  I had very good luck on eBay this week and managed to obtain a lovely sporran with a gorgeous engraved silver cantle.

So!  Things are progressing quite nicely.  Finishing will depend on the mail arriving from the UK, but in my experience, that should mean within the next couple of weeks.  I tend to have UK parcels arrive much sooner than parcels from Eastern Canada or the US for some reason.

While I wait, I’ll be stitching up a linen tunic.   I had to go through several collections before I found the perfect one:  Simplicity 3519.   I like that this one is uni-sex.  It can be used for a variety of costuming purposes.  I will be making B, the one they show in green on the top right of the photo.

 

 
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