Shawn L. Bird

Original poetry, commentary, and fiction. All copyrights reserved.

poem-anniversary July 25, 2016

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:00 am
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It has been one year

without you.

I could take off mourning now,

remove a black cloak of outward grief,

but I will never remove the sense of loss.

It has been one year

without you,

but I still hear your voice

I hear your laugh,

your bad jokes,

another repetition of your life story.

I could take off a mourning cloak

but I will wear you on my shoulder,

hear you in my ears,

love you with every breath

until we meet again.

.

https://shawnbird.com/2015/07/25/obituary-herbert-mosses-duguay/

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poem- addressing memories November 1, 2015

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:30 am
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Turning pages in the address book

cross a line across another entry.

Turning pages

studying the names crossed out

A memorial of friends and family gone

Greetings sent in murmured prayers

to rest in peace.

 

poem- #deadraccoonto September 9, 2015

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 9:22 pm
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In the Toronto dawn

the sun crept silently up to the

last mortal remains of the pudgy bandit,

laid out on the sidewalk like a sacrifice.

The call went out:

Three-one-one!  Three-one-one! Come!

The City promised swift removal of the corpse.

But–political promises being oft full of air–

the raccoon remains remained throughout the day.

Not content to leave sleeping Procyonidae lie

crowds marked the site of his demise,

memorial to the adorable, nocturnal beast

with flowers, photos, Tweets, and cards,

pseudo-grief growing with the day

while #deadraccoonto began to decay.

Until by the light of the moon (a raccoon’s party hour)

The City van came to gather the cadaver,

but left the flowers.

.

.

Embedded image permalink

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This was a social media event in July .  The body of a raccoon was found and reported.  A spontaneous mock-memorial grew up around it.  It was all recorded on Twitter, with even a council member  (Norm Kelly) participating.  I think it makes a fascinating commentary of social media through parody.

.

 

poem-sacrifice October 24, 2014

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 12:24 am
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An Argyll and Sutherland Highlander’s

simple service:

honour guard,

in respectful silence, stand proud

beneath a towering arch,

the bronze visages of

the nation’s memorial to those

fallen in foreign wars,

Keeping faith at the tomb

of the unknown soldier,

Clad in kilt  and jacket,

green as the fields of France,

red and white stockings over

shining white spats,

bronze warriors towering above

wept

as one of Princess Louise’s Highlanders

fell.

.

.

.

This poem references the powerful political cartoon by Bruce MacKinnon drawn in the aftermath of the shooting of Corporal Nathan Cirillo (a reservist with the Argylls and Sutherland Highlanders) on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, October 22, 2014:

Here is Corp Cirillo guarding the national war memorial:

The Argylls and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada on parade.

(I thought I was just posting links to original sites, but the images are showing up. Copyright remains with original sources).

 

poem-lost gift July 25, 2014

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 10:50 pm
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Family and friends

gather for funeral to

tell stories:

laughter

tears

admiration

appreciation.

I hope she knew

she touched this many.

that they’d have to

bring in extra chairs,

though she was a newcomer

to this community.

When cancer is found,

why not call everyone

to celebrate the life

while the body is there to hear?

Why not send her off for chemo

with these stories of love,

respect, and support?

Why wait to gather

when she’s not here

to receive the blessing?

.

.

.

Memorial today, packed house to celebrate Auntie Linda.  I just kept wishing she’d been here to know how many lives she’d touched.  

I was reminded of a send off my friend had for her husband when he was heading south for radiation, bone marrow transplant, etc.  Relatives came from afar, friends packed the building.  We sang, we told stories, we laughed, we sent him off with blessings for his young family, knowing in his heart how he’d inspired people.  When he passed away a few months later, we gathered  all again with sadder hearts, but that time together lifting him up has stayed with me as a very precious occasion to support a young family in a time of tragedy.

 

 

 

 

 
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