Shawn L. Bird

Original poetry, commentary, and fiction. All copyrights reserved.

SiWC workshop notes- Diana’s Managing a Mob October 28, 2019

Here are my notes from Diana Gabaldon’s Managing a Mob workshop:

Diana- Managing a mob

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Diana Gabaldon SiWC 2019

 

workshop notes: Back story by Diana Gabaldon November 30, 2018

The following notes were taken at Surrey International Writers’ Conference, October 21, 2012. (On Oct 23, 2012 I posted a blog that said I’d post notes ‘soon.’  Is six years later soon? lol)  

What to do with the Back story

Diana Gabaldon

SIWC 2012 Friday  

Backstory is what happened to your characters before they got to your front story.  Backstory still exists, the secret story you’re not telling, but you may give the reader a peek, but it’s every bit of a story.  How much are you going to let them see of the back story?.

Story doesn’t have to start when the character begins, it starts where the conflict starts.

How much does the author need to know vs how much the reader needs to know.  Some authors like to know everything, family trees, index cards, details  Myer Briggs

(Aside: Diana is INTJ/F (50 each end) on Myers Briggs)

What situation is your character in.  Remembering back to when she wrote Disney comics… In comic books, first page set up, big square shows main character and conflict.  4 small squares provide details, bottom of the page off on adventure.  Very straight-forward structure.  In novels, first page we need to know char/conflict.  Need to refer to your back story that explains how he does what he does, pick and choose where things are, when they go off on the story adventure.

Motivation: Entire arcs depends on the motivation, get out, get in deeper.  Want to give the story shape.  Back story explains motivation.  It helps to understand the psychology of the character

Diana starts writing and discovers it as she goes along.  The story evolved as the characters did over the years.  Logistically, something happened, use something else if you’ve mentioned previously.  You don’t need to know everything.  You just need to know them by the end! J It’s for you as an author to burnish and polish them to know.  Motherlode of info to mine out as you need it.  Characters detailed resume and psych profile, actual personality and speech is what lets them do the job.

Show vs tell.  Character needs to speak for himself without telling everything.

What does the reader need to know, don’t tell anything until they need to know it.  Gloat over your secret.  (Know the 5W+H)

Who’s central?  Where and what is he doing?  When may/not be important (Once upon a time there was a woodcutter who lived in a forest.  One day…)

Backstory IS the story in a mystery- historical novels, Josephine Hay Daughter of Time Richard 3,  thrillers and murder mysteries, what led to the moment of violence?  The identity novel- adopted.

19th c they spread out the story longer picturesque novel- it’s out of date- no patience these days, you have start with the excitement.  Unless you’re writing in a deliberately antiquated voice.  Follow the action in both front and back story.

Modern version modified authorial intrusion.  Old fashioned, Narrator unobtrusively adds.

(she tells the marijuana with grandma in the hospital story…lol)

When Lord John talks it’s normal, but the modern reader needs a little more info to understand how it was then.  (“of course there would be no rule of order” Author must  sneak up behind the character and whisper over his shoulder)

Reminding people of the Jacquard effect : Same colour, so it’s very subtle, rich look.  In text , weave back into the front.

e.g.Percy blurp from MOBY daily line last week. (Can’t find a reference to Percy Oct 2012 daily lines. Perhaps this from ECHO?) https://www.dianagabaldon.com/books/outlander-series/an-echo-in-the-bone/excerpt-5-an-echo-in-the-bone-sometimes-theyre-really-dead-lord-john-grey/

or tell it to another character, because the character needs the info.  You have to have a reason for telling that char what happened in the past.

Rachel and Ian walking to Valley Forge (Diana doing Scottish accent. HA!)   Ian having been married before/ not asking Rachel to marry him when he thought  Wolf eyes over her knee, Rollo making his allegiance clear…  Sneaking insertion of back story of Ian joining the Mohawk and marrying Emily  “Oh Ian, I do love thee”  (See end of notes for section*)

You have high tension dialogue going on, keep sense of the relationship, following the importance of the book.  The front story is clearly more important than the backstory, but response reveals current info.

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Question time at end of workshop:

Is your throat okay? I just naturally sound hoarse, but it’s better when I have some water

Should we have prologues? Prologue some people skip the prologue, but those are probably the same people who skip to the back of the book, and we don’t talk about those people.

Sometimes the Prologue can be used as hook if first chapter is slow.

For Diana, the prologue is the thematic statement. It reveals the “Voice of the book”.

Do you plan the arc of the conversation?  No

I ask, 😊 “Were the short stories and the Lord John books back story before they became stories on their own?”

Not really, Lord Johns fill in gaps, but I didn’t know there was gap.  I wrote Scottish Prisoner little gap  time. Check the timetable of history, oh. Battle of Quebec, I’ll send him there.

WW2 buff told her a Spitfire couldn’t have travelled over the channel, so she says “I bet I can work out a way that this is true…” and so Wind of All Hallows.  Didn’t know Roger’s parents’ story, but knew they had an interesting story.

How did a story as long as Outlander get accepted?! Outlander 304,000 words shortest of the series.  It was far too long to be accepted at the time, but she was sneaky and hid the length.  One way she got away with it

Deception: Husband was a programmer, back then publishers didn’t use computers. Outlander ms was all in written Courier 10, normal set ms Times Roman 12, looks 25% shorter than it was, played with margins .9”  When finalized with traditional sizes the typesetter nearly had heart attack, but it was too late. 😊

How to research- university libraries, research closest to hand and follow the thread (who said what info about what interesting thing, what resources did he use).  Sometimes you just can’t find, and that’s lucky because then you can just make it up. 😊

How do you start? She starts writing each day with a kernel, something concrete- euphonious, where is the light, what’s happening?  She thinks back and forth around the kernel,  things are floating around in your head, bits start sticking together, after a couple years it makes sense

Someone asks about the duality of having a science PhD and writing: Art and science are both the same thing, the ability to find patterns.  Devise hypothesis- is the pattern real- artist embodies in other way of showing, Scientist test purpose observation.  For a writer the hypothesis is the novel and research is peoples’ response.  Predict what happened in the gap.  Historical serendipity- imagine something that later turns out to be true- if you really embody it well.

How long did it take to write? It took 18 mos to write Outlander.  Scene polished as you go, so later revision basically unnecessary- just tweeks.

*Here is part of the daily line chunk that was read as example earlier to show how background information is given, but it weaves in with current story:

“Perhaps,” Rachel said, and swallowed, pushing him away with one hand flat on his chest, “perhaps thee should finish telling me about not being married, before we go further? Who was thy—thy wife—and what happened to her?”

He let go of her reluctantly, but would not surrender her hand. It felt like a small live thing, warm in his.

“Her name is Wakyo’teyehsnohnsa,” he said, and felt the accustomed inner shift at the speaking of it, as though the line between his Mohawk self and his white self had momentarily disappeared, leaving him awkwardly suspended somewhere in between. “It means Works with her Hands.” He cleared his throat. “I called her Emily. Most of the time.”

Rachel’s small, smooth hand jerked in his.

“Is?” she said, blinking. “Thee said _is_? Thy wife is _alive_?”

“She was a year ago,” he said, and with an effort, didn’t cling to her hand, but let her take it back. She folded her hands in her lap, fixed her eyes on him and swallowed; he saw her throat move.

“All right,” she said, with no more than a faint tremor in her voice. “Tell me about her.”

He took another deep breath, trying to think how to do that, but then abandoned the effort and spoke simply.

“D’ye truly want to know that, Rachel? Or do ye only want to ken whether I loved her—or whether I love her now?”

“Start there,” she said, lifting one brow. “_Does_ thee love her?”

(selection (c) Diana Gabaldon Written in My Own Heart’s Blood)

 

Writing conferences: The Magical Realm June 6, 2018

Here’s a guest blog I wrote for Gail Anderson-Dargatz about the value of attending writing conferences:

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https://www.gailanderson-dargatz.ca/cms/index.php/resources/35-guest-blogs/326-shawn-l-bird

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Do you have a writing conference that has changed your life?  Tell me about it in the comments below!

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I’m always happy to present at conferences, too, so if you are an organizer, drop me a line.

 

writing- #SiWC16 Keynote by Donald Maass October 26, 2016

Transcribed from my notes at Surrey International Writing Conference last weekend..  While I was sitting in the front row, I wasn’t typing, so he was speaking faster than I could record.  This is what I got.  Others may have something different!

Donald Maass keynote SiWC luncheon. Sunday, October 23, 2016

We live in a very angry age.  Everyone wants you to listen to their complaint and live as they do.

SiWC is our place of positivity. Our tribe.  We want to live here all the time, but it ends.

So as SiWC 2016 comes to an end, how will we survive the year until SiWC 2017?

We will write.

We will schedule writing time, give ourselves daily word count or time goals, put Xs on a calendar, work with a critique group so we have deadlines, read books on writing.

(Check his blog Writer Unboxed for ideas).

 Why do we write?

Orwell says it’s for hubris, aesthetics, a historical impulse, or to lead the way.

Susan Orlean says it’s to learn about the world

American Christian Fiction Writers say it’s to answer your own questions

Jodi Picoult says it’s to puzzle out the questions she doesn’t understand.

Exercise: For a minute free write why YOU write.  (Everyone writes)

Take that ^ exercise and make it visible, remind yourself daily why you do what you do.  Don’t worry about publishing.  Just sit down every day and write what you need to write.

When we write we connect to others.  When we read, others’ experiences become our own and we are no longer alone.

We are passionate about writing- we’re excited about conveying truth

Matter in motion creates energy.  Writing what matters creates energy.

Life disappears in a moment.  There might not be a chance beyond the writing session today.  Write your best truth in the best way possible.  Today.

#ThisDayWeWrite

(Donald at the podium, me directly in front of him with the long white and purple hair)

 

 

poem-embracing October 23, 2016

Filed under: Poetry — Shawn L. Bird @ 1:06 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Here we are

embracing our passion for words

learning from craftsmen

risking ourselves on the page

and handing the paper for critique.

Here we are

together for celebration of what we are

who we are

writers

powerless to resist the compulsion

powerful enough to create worlds.

 

interview- blog chain from Jodi McIsaac to Carol Mason September 7, 2013

In August I met the lovely Jodi McIsaac at When Words Collide Writers Conference in Calgary.  I loved her excellent novel Through the Door.   Jodi has invited me to participate in an author blog chain.  She asked me eleven questions. Here are my responses.

1. What do you love about the YA genre?

YA is awesome because it encompasses everything that the teen years encompass- pathos, angst, joy, celebration, challenge, success, energy, dreams, fear, possibility, and hope.  Whether it’s fantasy, sci-fi, horror, adventure, sports, drama, or romance, if it’s YA it has that vital spark of youth.  I love that.

2. What do you hate about it?

I don’t think there’s anything to hate.  It’s so diverse a genre that hating anything seems a bit shallow and pointless.  I do dislike authors who write for a young adult audience like they’re preaching and teaching to idiots.  I know teens are capable of deep thought and understanding.  They deserve a respectful attitude.

3. What was the first story you ever wrote?

I don’t know for sure, but my mother found a story called “Minnow’s Pride” that I’d written in grade three or four.  It was about a pride of lions.

4. What is your favourite mythological creature?

I quite like griffins.

5. Do you write on a regular schedule, or just whenever you can find time for it?

When I have a project on the go, I try to keep a regular schedule of about 6000 words a week.  I aim for 1200 words a day, Monday to Friday, and if I don’t reach that, then I have to have it done by Sunday night.  I tend to write throughout the day in three or four spurts.  I’m most active at night, though.

I’ve also done NaNoWriMo in November.  This involves writing 50,000 words in the month, averaging 1867 words every day.  This is a killer pace!  I prefer Camp NaNoWriMo in July because you can set your own goal.  I chose 28000 words which was much more humane pace for me.

When I’m working on the editing and re-writing I tend to procrastinate a lot.

6. What is your ideal writing space, and how does it compare to what you have now?

I want to write with a view of the lake and hills, but my current windows are too high for a view of the hills visible from the front my house, and my house is about five feet too low for a lake view, so….

I dream of a writing turret set as a third story with a wall of floor to ceiling windows on the front and wrapping six feet along each side.  On the rest of the wall space, I’d like floor to ceiling book shelves.  Following Stephen King’s instructions, the desk will be in the middle of the room.  There will be a comfy arm chair with room for dogs, who will readily climb the spiral staircase with a skill that amazes guests.

I keep mentioning this wonderful writing space to hubby, but so far he has not bought into the brilliance of my plan, hired the architect, or scheduled a builder.  (I do have a friend who’s an architect and my brother is a builder, so I could make this happen with the barest of encouragement…)  😉

Now, I write all over: lying on the couch, at a desk in the living room, in the bath…

7. What is your best strategy for dealing with critical reviews? 

If it’s a reviewer you trust, consider whether there’s any  observations there to take in order to improve the next project.  If there aren’t, and it’s just a matter of the reviewer having different taste or expectations, ignore it and focus on the positive interactions with those who enjoy what you write.  No point dwelling on the negative.  I had one review where the reviewer plainly hadn’t done more than skim the book, because she made several blatantly incorrect statements about the plot.  What can you do?

8. What is your best piece of writing advice for young writers?

Read.  Write.  Read.  Write.  Repeat.

Kids don’t accept the simplicity of that, though, so here’s what I repeat ad nauseum in my English classes to encourage them to do the above:

The words are in the pen.

The act of writing frees the words.

Don’t think: write.

Write crap.

First drafts don’t have to be good, they just have to be written.

Yes.  You can.

9. Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter?

Harry Potter.

10. If you could be one of the characters in your books for a day, who would it be?

Auntie Bright.  (I”m giggling as I type that).

11. Who is your literary hero, and why?

Diana Gabaldon.  She is a brilliant writer, crafts characters so real they are like dear friends, builds relationships with her fans, generously shares her wisdom with new writers, and encourages excellence.

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And now onto the next person in the literary chain! Let me introduce you to Carol Mason,  best-selling author of The Love Market, Send Me A Lover,  and The Secrets of Married Women.  The books are published in more than thirteen countries and available in more than nine languages.   I met Carol at the Surrey International Writing Conference where she was presenting a workshop on writing a good pitch.  She coached me through the writing and polishing of mine.  Her advice was so good the publisher requested  three chapters.  Carol is from Britain, but lives in Vancouver, BC now.

1. What inspired you to begin writing?

2. How does being a British ex-pat living in Canada impact your writing?

3. In your own books, who is your favourite character?  Why?

4. What author has inspired you?

5. You frequently write about your travels on your Facebook page.  What is your most memorable travel story?

6. Do you have a favourite writing quotation to share?

7. What do you like about writing for ‘women’s fiction’?

8. What has been the most interesting thing that has happened to you because you are an author?

9. Which of your books was the easiest to write?  Why?

10. Which of your books was the most difficult to write? Why?

11. I remember you telling me that someone broke into your house and stole your computer, and the two completed novels on it.  Was losing those works a blessing or a curse in the long run?

Now stay tuned to see how Carol replies!  I’ll provide a link when she does!)

 

what’s lingering from #SIWC2012 November 7, 2012

As I pound away on my NaNoWriMo piece, I keep hearing a voice in my head.  Not surprisingly, it’s Diana Gabaldon’s <g> but it’s not the advice I thought I was taking from my blue pencil or all the workshops I attended at the Surrey International Writers’ Conference.

At my blue pencil, Diana and I discussed historical language, dialogue, and whatnot, and while that was important,  what I keep hearing in my head is her laughing voice summarizing,  “You need to have something happen …   And it needs to be something fairly interesting.”

I mean, that’s not news.  That’s so obvious that it’s painful.  She was specifically saying that if the section of my historical novel that she read was going to end up as the beginning, then something intense had to happen.  However, the line is turning into a mantra when ever I sit down to write.  I suspect that is what makes Diana’s books so  engaging.  On EVERY page, something happens.  It’s good advice.  Don’t explain.  Make things happen.

As I write, I can clearly hear Diana’s voice, chuckling with me, just as my time with her was running out, and I think that basic though this comment might be, it might be the most important thing I took away from SIWC this year.

Something has to happen.

I intend to ponder it a lot.  We are authors.  We make things happen.  All these NaNoWriMo words are created from nothing.  We’re making things happen.  When I’m typing away I need to keep making things happen.

In my life, I need to make things happen.

NaNoWriMo count day 7: 1651  (Total 10,664)

 

 
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